Advocacy and some ways YOU can help!

There are some great minds and dedicated people advocating on behalf of lung cancer patients. We need them and I’m thankful for the work they do.  Many times they’ve been directly impacted by the disease, like these senators have:  Bipartisan legislation introduced to study lung cancer in women

You can help by calling, emailing, or writing  your Senators and Representatives.

Truth is, until recently there were very few lung cancer patients able to advocate for themselves as most were simply fighting for their life physically and in the moment, with no ability to fight in other ways. (433 Americans die daily from LUNG cancer.) With such dismal survival rates, few saw a future past that initial shock stage, and had no opportunity to reach a point where they even could consider advocacy.  But thankfully there are those survivors such as Bonnie Addario and Debbie Violette who not only survived and thrived, but took on the challenge of advocacy. I’m grateful to Bonnie (Bonnie Addario Lung Cancer Foundation), Debbie Violette (Free ME from lung cancer ), other survivor advocates, family member advocates, and others who take up this challenge on our behalf. ROS1cancer research is being conducted through the Bonnie Addario Lung Cancer Foundation

You can help by learning about lung cancer and sharing your knowledge with others.  Knowledge is power. Education is key.

And then, the elephant in the room.  Why, if so many more die of lung cancer than other cancers, is the funding so low?  It’s a sad, but easy answer.   There is the huge stigma associated with lung cancer – the thought that it is a smoker’s disease and we can simply eliminate it by not smoking.  Heart disease is also often caused by smoking – do we blame those with COPD for their condition and deny them research funding dollars?  Do we not help others with disease caused by addiction? And, come on folks, we all know that ALL YOU NEED TO GET LUNG cANCER would be… drum roll please… LUNGS, JUST LUNGS. We all have them, and even if you think you take care of them, you can get lung cancer.  I know.  And, we’re learning that more and more nonsmoking women are learning this the hard way – with a Stage IV lung cancer diagnosis.  So many are not lucky like me, and there is no targeted therapy drug for them that keeps the beast at bay while the next drug is being developed.  No cure  in sight, but great hope for lung cancer being a managed chronic disease in the not so distant future.

You can help by ending the stigma.  If you learn someone has lung cancer, DO NOT ask if he/she smoked please.  They have LUNG cancer.  Why should it matter to you if they smoked?  They have LUNG cancer.  Would you ask someone with breast cancer what they did to cause it?  Of course not.  A little compassion goes a long ways, please.  And chances are, sadly, if they are a nonsmoker they’ll be quick to tell you so, either because they’re still surprised or because of the stigma.  I know I did.  It’s really so weird when here you are dying and you think you have to defend yourself in some way.  Now, after two years, I can either say nothing, note that all you need (LUNGS), or share that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer.

Advocacy: public support for a particular cause.  So please – no more stigma.  When you share that someone you know has LUNG cancer, please don’t feel embarrassed for them.  Speak up for them.  Explain that 433 Americans die every day of lung cancer.  Explain that funding is needed.  Wear LUNG cancer awareness apparel and jewelry just as you would to show support for those with any other cancer.

If you’re in the Washington D.C. area on April 26 there is a rally to promote awareness.  The hope is to have 433 people in attendance.  Life and Breath Rally info

My lung cancer advocacy work: serving on a stakeholders advisory board to Maine Lung Cancer Coalition (MLCC) as they work on education, prevention, and screening; writing to my representatives; and I’m soon to have a final interview to be a Phone Buddy for Lung Cancer Alliance (LCA Phone Buddy Program).

Finding joy in the everyday EVERY day with Dan, the family, the three little dachshunds, and of course Dottie and Matilda, our Nigerian Dwarf goats.  That’s me!

 

Radon Causes Lung cancer

Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer.  It is easy to test your home and water. Mitigation is not difficult, not expensive, especially if you think about the alternative.

Here is a very interesting document from University of Maine that provides all the information you need (and more, but it’s interesting!):    UMaine Radon Document