Hopeful Health Update!

“Everything looks good!” said the “new to me” oncologist.  “You’ve been doing well for a LONG time.”  Okay friend, knock on wood, find a four leaf clover, and thank God when you make a statement like that.  It IS the truth.  I HAVE been doing very well on Lorlatinib.  In metastatic cancer world, it HAS been a long time. 546 days on Loralatinib  on that appointment day.  I am grateful to the doctors, nurses, researchers, and all who send positive energy and prayers.  Hope, I always have hope.

My appointment was great!  This doctor was very interested in my health and in the work of the ROS1ders.  He raved about how impressed he is with the ROS1ders advocacy work.  And, it is always nice to see Dawn, the clinical trial nurse.

It was a different trip though because Dan couldn’t go.  He recently had a total hip replacement and no long rides for him just now.  My sister drove me, while the “children” helped Dan with chores, etc.  My sister began this Dana-Farber relationship with us nearly three years ago, traveling with us as a note-taker and support when we first started our cancer journey.  I’m glad she was able to hear, “Everything looks good!”  Even my labs were all good.

So.  Well, my 3 year “cancerversary” just passed.  While I seldom really stop thinking about how fragile this string I’m hanging onto is, I think we’ve made a very wonderful new life for ourselves. And, this winter for the very first time ever, we are both at home every day.  And yes, it IS a good thing we love each other.  We are loving being together.  I’ve been busy caring for the goats and dogs, filling the wood stove, and keeping the ice and snow off the doorstep.

A new hobby is is also keeping me busy and happy.  I’ve spent my adult life simply knowing I couldn’t draw, paint, etc.  While I see myself as creative minded, I don’t see myself as an artist for sure.  Well, to my surprise – like most things – if you put your mind to it and practice, even I can learn to draw, paint, make fun art with mixed media, and Zentangle.  Yes, it’s true.  I’m having great fun – not just crafting, but learning to draw, learning to use watercolors, learning lots of mixed media techniques.  And, I’m no longer afraid to pick up a pen and use it for something other than writing.  Who knew this would be so much fun.  I don’t even mind sharing it, no matter what it looks like.  I’m having fun and learning, while playing and practicing.  Seems crazy, but it’s true.

One more fun thing has happened.  Years ago, as part of a senior thesis project at Goddard College, I wrote a children’s story.  At the time Dan really wanted me to see if I could get it published, but the one place I sent it to rejected it.  I tucked it away for the someday grandkids.  Well, welcome to the world of self-publishing!  I’ve worked with a publishing company and illustrator, and will soon be the published author of a children’s book.  (Further details when it actually comes out!)  I wasn’t sure I’d live to see it done.  Seriously.  In May, it was to take 3 months, and here we are in January.  Long time for someone living with metastatic lung cancer.   Looking hopeful though.  Good thing.  It’s on my life list to get done.  (You can smile now.  I am.)

Finally, if all goes well I won’t need to go to Boston until early April.  Twelve weeks!  You can find me here in our winter home on the mountainside, finding joy in the everyday every day. (It’s easy to do!)  Feeling grateful, joyful, peaceful, and as always – hopeful.

fullsizeoutput_11c9.jpeg

 

Another year

Another year gone by.  That’s how many people say it I think.  Another year.  Me?  ANOTHER YEAR!!! YES!  We did it!  I’m really here to see ANOTHER YEAR begin!!! Here I am, LIVING with metastatic (here, there, everywhere) lung cancer. Since that awful diagnosis I’ve celebrated not one, not two, but three, yes THREE New Years.  How amazing is that?! Well, I can tell you.  Very.  Very amazing.

New Year’s Eve 2012, Moshi, Tanzania, Africa.  New Year’s Eve 2012, Amsterdam, Netherlands, Europe.  New Year’s Eve 2012, Massachusetts, United States, North America.  That was an amazing New Year’s Eve for sure.  Got on a plane in Africa on New Year’s Eve, landed in Europe for another flight still New Year’s Eve, and finally made it to Boston, MA in the United States on New Year’s Eve.  Three continents.  Not likely to have another New Year’s Eve like that one.  If our flight had not been cancelled the day before we wouldn’t have had that one.  Lucky I guess.  Not that we felt that way at the time.  But it is kinda cool to say we celebrated New Year’s Eve in/on three continents.

Lucky we were in 2012 and lucky we are today.  Blessed.  Fortunate.  Grateful.  Joyful.  Loved. Content. Hopeful. Those are some of my words I carry with me from 2018 into 2019.  They may sound “soft”, yet they come from, and give to me, strength, courage, and peace.  I am excited to see what things our family will celebrate in 2019.  Graduations, family gatherings and outings.  Every day a gift.  I know Dan and I have much to look forward to, beginning with our winter on the mountainside, cozy in our home with the three little dachshunds, and the goats nearby in their little barn.

May 2019 be a year of joy and health for you.

Another year!

Good news Health Update

Chest and abdomen scans, brain MRI, and blood work all look good!  Wow, that means the cancer that is there  is stable and the drug isn’t messing with my body badly enough to need to make changes.  Now, unless I become symptomatic, we can breathe a sigh of relief for another nine weeks.  That takes us through the holidays all the way to my third cancerversary!  Yup, three years since the big blindside.  Three years of figuring out how to live well with metastatic lung cancer.  Three years of living!

Below:  February 2016 and May 2016 after two months on my first targeted therapy, crizotinib.

IMG_2968 (1)

Yesterday at 3:30 a.m. we left home to drive to Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for the above tests  and an appointment with my oncologist and clinical trial nurse.   Big traffic jam getting in, but 6 hours later we arrived, parked, made our way to Dana L2 (I think).  I got my beverage of the day in prep for the scans.  Then blood draw (extra for the study) and IV in for scans.  Scans done and in for brain MRI.  Ear plugs, bean bags around my head, hockey mask on, and slide in for a noisy, long nap.  Did I say it was long?  Oh yeah, I did. IV out. Then back to Yawkey and up to 3 for a very quick cafeteria  lunch, and on to the 10th floor.  Vitals done (anyone wonder why the blood pressure might be up), EKG, and off we go to the patient room.  Whew!  In comes a fellow (yes, a fellow fellow) and the nicest trial nurse you can imagine.  Dr. ? (the fellow) told us the scans looked good and that Dr. J, my oncologist was waiting for the results of the MRI and would be in shortly.  We talked about my neuropathy, and my theory that the tendon inflammation I have (hands and feet) is related.  No one can explain it to me, still.  After listening to my heart and breathing (all good!), the fellow left, we talked with Nurse D, and then soon the Fellow and Dr. J were back. The brain MRI looked stable too.  So, good news all around.

Dr. J suggested I might want to reduce my dosage again to see if that helped with the neuropathy.  Early on in the trial we reduced the lorlatinib from 100mg to 75mg for that reason.  I said, “No thanks, I don’t want that nasty beast back in my brain.”  (Not that it is totally out.)  We talked about it a bit more, and Dr. J said, “So you can live with it this way?”  And of course I replied, “You used the key word there.  I choose to live. I’d rather not take a chance on it now.”  And so, I remain at 75mg.

Finally it was off to floor 2 to wait for the cancer fighter, our Lady Lorlatinib.  I imagine her dressed in white this day for Lung cancer Awareness month, riding from the heavens on Pegasus.  She is a powerful ROS1 cancer fighting targeted therapy drug – that I know.  Whenever I feel her working in my brain, I am grateful.  Grateful to ALL that make it possible for me to live.

When everything was done, it was only 2:45 p.m. We find the car in P5 and head to Seabrook (much cheaper place to stay), an hour away.  In good traffic that is.  Two hours for us yesterday…   Dinner and off to sleep. Up at 5:00 a.m., a stop for breakfast, and home before 10:00 a.m.   A whirlwind 30 hours!  For both of us – thank you Dan.

And now here I am on the couch with the dachshunds, bird feeders filled!  Finding joy in the everyday every day.IMG_0763.jpg

 

ROS1ders are raising research funds to learn more about, and to find treatments for ROS1 cancer.  If you can help us, just follow the link below.  Thank you.

Donate to ROS1 cancer research

Feeling Grateful for the Opportunity

Feeling grateful, again, still, always.  Yesterday was a purely nice day.  It was the day of the annual Save Your Breath 5K to benefit the work of (Free ME from Lung cancer) , an organization that more Mainers need to learn about.

On the first Sunday in November, runners gather at the Y in Augusta at 7:00 AM (only it feels like 8:00 due to time change).  Many there are running because they love running this late season race, many others because they love someone with lung cancer, have lost someone to lung cancer, or have lung cancer themselves, and some run for both the love of running and the cause.  This latter describes my grandchildren and  their mom, my daughter by marriage and heart.  They love to run and they got up at 5:00 a.m. to travel to the race in my honor, to support Free ME from Lung cancer.  And running with my grandchildren was their great-aunt, my sister.  On the sidelines with me were Dan, my son and my brother-in-law. It was so wonderful to watch Team polepolebreathe.org in their tie-dye T-shirts (over or under their warmer gear) running or watching on this crisp, clear November day, supporting the lung cancer community. Just perfect.

After the race we went to breakfast at Mulholland’s Augusta House of Pancakes.  It’s a great restaurant, we love that you can walk in with a large group (last year I think we had nine) and they will happily accommodate you.  A couple of interesting things happened there. First, a governor candidate stopped by our table, noticing the “matching” Ts and asked my granddaughter what we were up to.  Ten year old C. did an impressive job of explaining.  The candidate seemed to have no awareness of the event, despite the promoting Free ME from Lung cancer does in that region of the state (and has for the six years of the race.)  If that candidate wins, they will get a letter from me while we are still “fresh” in their mind.

And then came an opportunity, for the children and for the grown-ups as well, to understand better why we participate, why I post.  It happened as we were leaving.  Our waitress must have asked my son (walking out just in front of me) if we had a family member with lung cancer.  He replied his mom.  With eyes filled with tears, she shared that she’d just lost her mom.  He quickly said, “My mom’s right here.”  By then, while I hadn’t heard the words she’d said, I knew she’d been deeply hurt by this cancer monster that took my dad and has so changed my life.  I stepped up, and she asked if it was me who had lung cancer.  Nodding, I said, “You look like you need a hug,” and reached out to her.  Here, in the middle of the restaurant, two strangers sharing  this bond, her grief, my hope, our compassion. In that hug I could feel the love for her mother.  She asked about my health, so grateful that I’m doing well.  And even though she doesn’t know my name I know I’m on her prayer list, and she on mine.  An opportunity to understand.

The cancer journey – when you’re stage IV I think “journey” describes a healthy, forward-looking approach – is filled with wonderful opportunities.  Sometimes you need to seek them out and sometimes they find you.   Be open to them.

Lung cancer awareness can save lives.  Test your home for radon.  Know the symptoms.  Don’t ignore that persistent cough-cough.

Finding joy in the everyday every day.

Hope, always have hope!

44038362_1926012567514503_7130733789784834048_n

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”  Margaret Mead.  Well, I’m not sure that it is the only thing, but I believe the first statement.

We all have our burning issues or passions that we feel are the most important at any given moment in time.  For me it could be staying alive (that’s going pretty well!) or Lung Cancer Awareness month and raising fund for ROS1 research.  Always I think about family, children, education, nature.

But right now, I can’t think about any of those things.  In case you haven’t noticed, our country is in crisis.  No material gains or political beliefs can be worth what we’ve allowed to happen.   We cannot let hatred, fear, and greed take over.  We each elect officials for varied reasons, but I cannot believe that as a country this is what we want.  Hate, fear, divisiveness, violence being spread, promoted, led by the President of the United States of America.  The most respected leadership position in our country.  No concern for the people or the land, here or anywhere.  (I’ve plenty of evidence to support this statement, but I won’t do that to you.)

Where is the courage?  Where are those leading with courage and strength, hope, compassion, truth, and yes, even love?  Much like the “helpers” Mr. Rogers spoke about, they are here – look for them.  Courage IS here.  Those words from Fred Rogers about helpers, used so often, are advice for children, words to help children find hope in inexplicable, horrific situations.  We, though, are the adults.  We must be the helpers, be the models for the children of the world, our children – in Yemen, in cages in U.S. border states, in our neighbor playgrounds – our children.  No matter why we may have made the choices as individuals and as a nation that have brought us to this place, we can now effect positive change.  Each, in our daily lives, can do so in our treatment of others, and by living the life we want to model for our children.  Teaching, nurturing, and living a life of courage, hope, compassion, truthfulness.  Faith, joy, love.

We may not all consider ourselves leaders or activists, but we can all vote.  (Even that right is being made difficult for many citizens, here in our United States of America.)  Voting is not only our right (thanks to the courage and determination of many, see the 15th and 19th amendments), voting is our responsibility.  Please vote.

Our children, the children of our neighborhood, our country, our world, are looking for helpers.  Love thy neighbor – we’re all neighbors.  And, always have hope.

On a personal note – we are settled, goats and dachshunds too, in our winter home. (Yes, I understand how lucky I am to be able to say that.)  Next week I once again go to Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for a full day of tests and appointments.  Finding joy in the everyday every day.

Corinne Pert, ROS1der

Father’s Day 2018

Father’s Day 2018

Father’s Day, a special day to honor fathers.  As I write this Dan is coaching a Little League game. He is coaching with Tim, our son, who is also a father.  On the team is Tim’s 12 year old son, one of our five grandchildren.  It is the last game of the season.  This may be the last time these two fathers have the opportunity to coach LL together – with much sadness they think this is so, I’m not so sure.  Time will tell.  To me, on this day before Father’s Day, what they are doing is one day in the greatest of love stories,  This story includes not only them, father and son, but my father as well.

I shall try to tell this baseball love story through my eyes, watching it for the past nearly 40 years.  Baseball is only the vessel, or vehicle perhaps, in and through which this story unfolds.  Not that baseball isn’t one of their passions!  Believe me, they all shared a passion for the sport, especially Little League.  But passions, I think, are developed, nurtured over time, under certain conditions.  And in this story of mine, those conditions are love, time, and dedication.  Their many talents and skills, innate and learned along the way flourished under these conditions.

I don’t really remember quite how the beginning of this baseball love story all came to be – I’m sure Dan could fill in the details for me, but it’s my story, so…  When our children were young, about 7 and 5, my dad recruited Dan to help coach LL baseball when my brother was playing. We were part of the group to begin official LL in our area.  I recall many meetings before Coastal Little League was a reality.  A desire to see something done correctly, well and be sustainable brought people together, for the players – children ages 9-12 at the start.  Dad and Dan, working together, were instrumental in making that happen.  Looking back, this was the first test of the conditions of my story – love, time, and dedication.  My dad and Dan’s relationship strengthened and flourished through their shared passion for youth sports, in this case baseball.  

And so it was, before our children were old enough to play, Dan became a LL coach.  And because we always did everything together – our children grew up at the ball field.  And the baseball love story flourished – often with my dad keeping score, Dan coaching, and our son usually sitting on the bench, soaking it all in.  All-star play was especially exciting in those beginning years with Dad as official scorer, a role he kept for years, and Dan learning to become the great coach he is today. And then it came time for our children to play – first our daughter who went on after LL to play softball in middle school and high school, and then our son, where the father-son baseball love story took on a life of its own.

Dan loved coaching Tim’s team, and they were a fun bunch of kids.  Tiny, but mighty.  We lived LL baseball for four years. (Many more before and after, but four with Tim in LL.)   Regular season, all-stars, tournaments, Blue Hill Fair – they just couldn’t get enough baseball.  The summer of 1990 was maybe the pinnacle of the LL experience for many of those involved.  It was a magical summer.  Father and son lobstered together by day and played baseball at night.  If they weren’t playing baseball, they were talking baseball, strategizing and preparing for the next big game.  As a catcher, Tim became the coach on the field, able to see the game only as one with experience can – at 12.  The highlight of this summer was making it to the State Tournament.  I well remember seeing them all -grandfather (my dad), father, and son as they looked over the beautiful new field they would be playing on, as they worked together, again – scorekeeper, coach, and player over the course of the tournament.  There were so many moments lived and memories made that are truly priceless from those few days.  Not just for them of course, but my story is about them, the fathers in this love story.  Love, time, and dedication: to youth baseball, to doing things well, to one another, sustained over time, through love.

Dan continued to coach Tim’s team until there weren’t teams for Tim to play on that he could  coach. Tim played in high school, American Legion ball, and in college.  His dad always there to watch him.  Love, time, and dedication – most of all love – from it the others come.  But the love story had been written and couldn’t end when a boy is 12 or 14 or when there isn’t a team to coach.  There’s always a team to coach!  Because when you’ve built something correctly and well, and you nurture it through the years, it not only sustains, but thrives, flourishes.  And so started a new chapter in this love story – father and son coaching together, son as coach with father helping.  It never matters to Dan.  As much as he loved coaching Tim, he loves coaching with Tim.  He admires his son’s knowledge and skills, the way he conducts himself, his way of working with youth. Dan talks with me about the things he can contribute to their shared passion when working together.  “What love and dedication,” I think! 

Dan’s early coaching led him to coaching many other youth sports over the years with our daughter Mandy and Tim, and even with our grandchildren beginning with PeeWee basketball 14 or 15 years ago.  This year, 36 years after that first season of baseball, he coached his granddaughters’ elementary school basketball teams with Tim and Mandy both working with him.  Love, time, and dedication: to youth sports, to doing things well, to one another, sustained over time,  all through love.

Today I think of my father and how very happy, and yes – proud he would be to know how this love story has flourished. Grandfather and father coaching the son.  Giving one another love, time, and dedication.  And doing it well.  May all children experience such love.  My timeless love story, never to end…

 

And yes Dad (and all you other Coastal LL baseball fans out there), even though they are coaching and playing for what was once their rival team, they won the league championship today!